Alcorn McBride to Unveil V16Pro Show Controller at InfoComm

Alcorn McBride to Unveil V16Pro Show Controller at InfoComm

The What: Alcorn McBride will unveil the latest version of its powerful V16 Pro show control system at InfoComm 2016. Alcorn McBride will exhibit the new V16 Pro and additional products at Booth N1037 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

The What Else: The new V16 Pro builds on the brand’s top-of-the-line controller. Its launch follows the release of WinScript Live 4.0 for PC and Mac. The new model controls hundreds of devices and executes over 100,000 events per second. This processing power, along with the integration of WinScript Live and ShowTouchT panel software, provides a robust and comprehensive show control system that’s significantly easier to learn and maintain than other control solutions, according to the company.

The new V16 Pro stays true to Alcorn McBride’s design philosophy of creating reliable, purpose-built products. A solid-state unit designed for timed control and synchronous applications, the V16 Pro offers high frame rate support at 60fps accuracy (17ms). It is tightly integrated with Alcorn McBride’s Binloop family of products, the themed entertainment industry-standard for synchronized audio and video players.

The new media playback timeline feature can be used to skip forward or backward through Binloop media and control events. Users can also tweak audio, video, and control timing without watching the entire show. Integration is also provided for systems like PLCs, DSPs, animation control systems, LCD displays, projectors, and hundreds of other devices commonly used in themed entertainment applications.

The V16 Pro features simple drag-and-drop touchpanel editing, which allows users to create themed touchscreens. Also, users do not need to understand protocol details to gain a powerful level of control over their system. The extensive library of drivers included with WinScript Live 4.0 provides universal-remote-like control of external devices. Complex aspects of device control are eliminated and replaced by simple commands like “power on" and “play.” The show control architecture executes these events based on a precise timeline to ensure that everything is happening exactly when it is supposed to, 24 hours a day, on a reliable hardware platform.