URC is Windows-Compliant by Joe Salvatore - AvNetwork.com

URC is Windows-Compliant by Joe Salvatore

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It's official: Microsoft now acknowledges all Universal Remote Control product drivers as Windows-compliant. Our device drivers have passed all applicable reliability, stability, and compatibility requirements.

This development will ensure an enhanced installer experience. Previously, when attempting to update a remote or upload an existing configuration from a remote, you may have been prompted to install or update device drivers manually. You may have encountered messages like "connection error" or "unable to connect," which in turn led you on an arduous journey through the depths of Device Manager.

No more! Now that our device drivers have been recognized as "Microsoft approved," they will install and update automatically once you connect the device to your Windows PC. You'll never again need to search for and manually update any "unknown device" drivers.

Before I bid you adieu for this month, I'd like to take the opportunity to mention a couple of additional and important compatibility/connectivity facts regarding some of our products that I hope you'll find helpful:

The MX-950 is not suited for use on a Windows Vista or Windows 7 PC. However, there is still full product support for this remote. You simply must use a Windows XP machine to update one with program modifications.

The MSC-400 should be programmed using a Windows XP or Windows Vista 32-bit system. It will not accept an information transfer from a Windows Vista 64-bit or Windows 7 OS-based system.

MX-880 remote controls manufactured after September 2009 are HID (Human Interface Devices), which means they do not require a driver.

Joe Salvatore is URC's Technical Support Manager. This blog was originally included in URC's newsletter. For further support on this tech tip, email techsupport@universalremote.com

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