Countdown to InfoComm: SVSi Launches Second Generation AV Networking Series - AvNetwork.com

Countdown to InfoComm: SVSi Launches Second Generation AV Networking Series

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There was a strange phenomenon last week in Huntsville, Alabama, where SVSi designs and manufactures the physical manifestation of convergence. Local meteorologists were startled by a strange red cloud that appeared on radar screens on a sunny afternoon. It was later revealed to be the Redstone Military Arsenal’s apparent experiments with radar-blocking “chaff” – particles released into the atmosphere to create a technological cloud. But for a few hours, it seemed like quite the fascinating weather event.

Just another day in the life of Huntsville, where the presence of the military aerospace community is definitely notable, observes Bob Sharp, director of sales engineering for SVSi. “It’s one place where your neighbor is probably a rocket scientist. I believe we have more Ph.D.s per capita than any other city in the U.S.”

That seems an appropriate backdrop for SVSi, which has established itself firmly in the field of AV networking, and in the past year has tripled its business. With installations ranging from giant corporate campus-wide deployments to your local house of worship, SVSi has proven itself and is ready to expand its market.

At InfoComm this year, SVSi will debut the second generation of its video-over-IP technology in conjunction with the introduction of three new product families. The new N Series consists of N1000, N2000, and N3000 encoders and decoders, each tailored to specific network requirements and budget considerations.

The N1000 is an in-room solution with a fixed bandwidth of 880 Mbps. The N2000 is 10-200 Mbps LAN solution backwardly compatible with SVSi’s current generation of JPEG2000 products. It includes input and output scaling, POE, and enhanced network capabilities common to the full N series suite. The N3000 switches and distributes H.264 streaming video with HD quality and bandwidth between 32 kpbs and 10 Mbps.

With the new products, SVSi “can now address pretty much any requirement for networked AV or streaming,” Sharp noted. The N1000 can handle in-room or local installations, the N2000 is ideal for LAN-type video applications, and the N3000 is aimed at WAN applications.

And on a rocket-science level, SVSi has managed to conjure a common control platform that works across all three product families. There’s no need to learn new programming for a H.264 or JPEG product. Additionally, the in-house designed and built control layer can seamlessly control a mix of N series products.

SVSi’s full range of network-attached accessories, including digital video recorders, windowing processors, transcoders, and controllers, will be available for each N Series product line.

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