The University of Southern California Enhances Interactive Technology

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Christie has showcased its new MicroTiles solutions at the opening of the new Interactive Media Building at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts (SCA).

Christie is partnering with USC to provide students and faculty with access to the latest in visual technologies.

A gala reception was followed by an open house where attendees, comprised mostly of game and tech-industry executives, as well as faculty of SCA and friends of USC, could observe and interact with different programs and content being developed for new entertainment and educational projects. Content for the 30 Christie MicroTiles was provided by USC School of Cinematic Arts.

The reception was also followed by a panel discussion on “The Future of Entertainment,” featuring George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and Don Mattrick of Microsoft, and was moderated by Julia Boorstin of CNBC. The panelists discussed current technology shifts and trends with emerging media and outlined where they believe the entertainment industry is headed in the future.

The SCA Interactive Media Building will house programs that include the Interactive Media & Games Division, the Media Arts + Practice Bachelor’s and Doctoral Programs, and the Institute for Multimedia. It will also house R & D labs, such as Game Innovation, Mixed Reality, and Environmental Media Lab. The building features digital technology including 4K digital projection, game testing rooms, and multitouch screens.

“At the USC School of Cinematic Arts we always want our students to have access to technologies that will improve their ability to tell exciting stories and the Christie MicroTiles solution literally allows them to expand their vision,” said dean, USC, Elizabeth M. Daley. “This is the kind of technology that seamlessly supports the best narrative storytelling, and the visual displays are just stunning.”

“We’re delighted to support the School with our proven Christie MicroTiles solution, built on DLP technology, and used around the globe in many visual display applications,” said president and chief executive officer, Christie Digital Systems US, Jack Kline. “Christie MicroTiles are ideal for a wide range of demanding applications, including architectural elements, out-of-home advertising, command and control video walls, and event production, so we look forward to the content that the students will create to exploit the many features of our award-winning technology.”

Using DLP projection and Light Emitting Diode (LED) illumination technology, Christie MicroTiles offer brighter images and a wider color palette than conventional flat panel LCD and plasma displays. With no practical limit to the number of tiles in a display, Christie MicroTiles produce a canvas, arranged in any shape or scale, with an unlimited number of fine pixels.

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