Bob McCarthy Returns to Meyer as Director of System Optimization

Meyer Sound has appointed Bob McCarthy to the newly created position of director of system optimization. An international authority in sound system design and optimization, educator, and published writer, McCarthy will be a part of the R&D department with a mission to advance networked audio solutions.

In addition, he will remain an active instructor in the Meyer Sound education program, and support the design and commissioning of new Meyer Sound installations.

  • McCarthy's work with Meyer Sound began long before joining the company full-time as director of system optimization. He was one of the earliest users of Meyer Sound products in the 1980s, and has been a pivotal figure in the development of all three generations of the SIM source independent measurement system. In the mid 1980s, he taught the first "SIM School" which later evolved into the Meyer Sound worldwide education program. McCarthy's book, "Sound Systems: Design and Optimization" (Focal Press, 2006), is considered a definitive work in audio education.
  • "Bob has played many roles with Meyer Sound in the past three decades," said John McMahon, executive director of operations & digital products. "As he returns as a full-time employee, he's bringing with him an unmatched wealth of audio knowledge and experience with Meyer Sound systems. This is great news for our R&D department as well as our many customers who count on Meyer Sound solutions to tackle the most difficult acoustic challenges."
  • An independent audio consultant for more than 15 years, McCarthy has built a rich project portfolio. Installations he has worked on include stadiums and arenas such as Ohio State University and SBC Arena in San Antonio, TX; performance halls such as Harpa concert hall in Iceland, Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, and Arts Centre Melbourne; five of the world's largest theme parks; and more than 10 Cirque du Soleil productions.
  • "It's a privilege to join a company that is shaping the future of sound reinforcement," said McCarthy. "From building loudspeaker systems with dedicated Control Electronics Units (CEUs) in the late 1970s to now integrating room optimization and audio distribution, Meyer Sound has always been at the forefront of building total systems. By working in the field with other users of Meyer Sound equipment, I aim to further our understanding of complete system implementation to benefit our R&D and education efforts."